Dorothy Van Riper

Dorothy Van Riper, 83, of Bryan, passed away Thursday January 2, 2014. Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday, January 6, 2014 at Callaway-Jones Funeral Home in Bryan. Funeral services are set for 10 a.m. Tuesday, January 7 at First Presbyterian Church in Bryan.

Dorothy was born July 10, 1930, in Atlanta, Georgia, to Roy and Anne Dodd. She has been an active member of the Bryan College Station community. Dorothy taught many years and retired as a professor at Texas A&M University. She was an active member in the First Presbyterian Church in Bryan, and she enjoyed the opera, fine arts, and traveling the world.

She was preceded in death by her son Michael Samuelson, and her parents.

Survivors include her husband, Dr. Paul Vanriper, of Bryan; grandson, Justin Samuelson, of Colorado; great grandchildren, Natalie, Dillon, and Addison Samuelson; and by Cody and Jessica Hassell.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent in her memory to the Bubba Moore Memorial Group at 100 West Brookside, Bryan, TX 77801, or to First Presbyterian Church at 1100 Carter Creek Pkwy, Bryan, TX 77802.

Express Condolences at CallawayJones.com

Condolences

  1. Our deepest sympathies are extended to Paul and to other members of the family. Dorothy was a delightful person who will be remembered for her many civic contributions.

  2. Our condolences to Paul, Justin, and other family members. We will miss seeing her sweet smile when getting Paul to and from the bridge group.

  3. Our deepest sympathies to Paul and family on Dorothy’s passing. We have so many fond memories of Dorothy from our years at Texas A&M in the English Department. She was very welcoming to us when we were new faculty members. When she retired, Dorothy gave me her children’s literature journals–a gift I use and treasure to this day.

  4. I knew Dorothy as a professor when I was an undergraduate, and as a mentor when I entered graduate school. I learned so much about teaching from her, and will always carry her with me in my own service to my students. Her wit, wisdom, and hospitality will be remembered fondly by all whose lives she touched.

  5. I knew Dorothy as a professor when I was an undergraduate, and as a mentor when I entered graduate school. I learned so much about teaching from her, and will always carry her with me in my own service to my students. Her wit, wisdom, and hospitality will be remembered fondly by all whose lives she touched.

  6. I am so sorry for your loss. I knew her while I was a graduate student in the TAMU English Department. She always greeted me with a warm smile. May God grant your family peace and grace.

  7. My husband Paul & I were so saddened to learn of Dorothy’s sudden passing. Our sincere sympathy to Paul & all the family. What an inspiration she’s been to all of us, especially we seniors her age & older! May God comfort each of you during these difficult days.

  8. Dorothy’s best friend in Miami happened to be my favorite English teacher when I was in high school. Our accidental discovery of this meant Dorothy and I had a profound spiritual bond that made my love of Dorothy essential to my well being. I am bereft, heartened only by my phone visits with Justin and the knowledge that Paul can rely upon him in the days ahead. Dorothy’s loyalties were profound, unwavering, and possessed of a stellar energy that burned in their intensity. Every close friend was invigorated by her passionate commitment to the friendship with which she blessed them. She dared to bully us to live harder and more expansively. She was a woman of great heart who ventured far in all her endeavors, never sparing herself, never pausing for breath. That she died short of breath is telling. I feel her now with each breath I take, and she will live in me for all my breaths remaining. She was better than a mother to me. She was Dorothy. Relentless advocate. Keeper of my histories.

  9. Mrs. Van Riper was one of the best teachers I had when attending Texas A&M and made me love reading. I remember from the first day of class when she introduced herself with an emphatic “Mrs.” Dorothy Van Riper and “not doctor!” I remember when she explained that she didn’t use email and preferred in-person communication! She was an absolute delight of a teacher, such a fresh change from the norm. She commanded the classroom from beginning to end and hers was the only class I can recall where no one wanted to leave early. She was a true leader and an inspiration to me, even to this day.

    She had a gift for making people laugh at the same time as we were enjoying the wonders of children’s literature. She had such enthusiasm that I remembered her. I wondered if she was still teaching when I searched for her today and found out she passed away.

    The world lost a great one in Mrs. Van Riper. I’ll carry with me the memories of her class and try to pass on the love of reading she shared with me and many other students.

  10. I got to know Dorothy and Paul VanRiper well many years ago when I was a graduate student at Cornell and rented an apartment in their home. Lovely people, and Dorothy in particular was a great mentor as I struggled through comprehensive doctoral exams. I have not seen them since 1970, but will always carry them in my thoughts and prayers.

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